Grouse Mountain Field Trip

The field trip to Grouse Mountain was PHENOMENAL despite the constant downpour of rain throughout the day!  (Many kudos to our stalwart parents and volunteers who braved the wet weather!)

After a long bus ride we arrived at the Grouse Mountain Tram.  It was exciting to all squash into the Skyride tram and head up to the Alpine Station. We could feel the swaying, bumps, and shakes as we headed up the Mountain, but it was so rainy and foggy that we couldn’t actually see how high we were!  Our morning was spent in an authentic Pacific Northwest Coast Longhouse, where we both watched and participated in, the educational Hiwus Presentation (First Nations Cultural Experience) led by an elder of the Squamish Nation. We learned about the ancient customs, legends, dances and rich history of our First nation people. We listened to singing and drumming, and got to do our own “Raven Dance”!

During the lunch hour we watched the Lumberjack Show.  The Lumberjacks didn’t worry too much about falling in the water for the log rolling competition, because they were already soaking wet!  They were really funny! Fortunately, after the show we were able to eat our lunches inside where it was dry and warm.

The afternoon was spent learning about the similarities and differences between the three species of North American bears.  The videos were wonderful!  Then we got to explore different tables of artifacts.  We had to sort out skulls, claws, and footprints to match them up with the correct animal.  All the parents were put to work at the tables, so we didn’t get any photos… too bad!  We also got to see the orphaned Grizzly bears as they wandered through their enclosure.  Wow, they were SO BIG!

 

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What was YOUR favourite part of the day?

 

 

Remembrance Day 2016

poppy

 

Poppy Poem… Author Unknown

Poppy, Poppy, what do you say?
Wear me on Remembrance Day.
Poppy, Poppy, what do you tell?
That many soldiers in battle fell.
Poppy, Poppy, what do you know?
That peace on earth should grow and grow.

Poppy, we are but children small,
We are too little to do it all.

Children, you may do your part.
Love one another is how you start.
Play without fighting,
Share your games and toys.
Be kind and thoughtful to all girls and boys.

We ALL have a part in making the WORLD a Place of Peace.

Our school had a special Remembrance Day ceremony.  Each class created its own wreath. These wreaths were placed, one by one, on stands at the front of the Assembly.  We had presentations of songs and poetry by students and the choir, and we were fortunate to have a Pinetree Secondary student, Colin, play “Reverie” on the trumpet to begin our minute of silence.

In our class, we learned how the Poppy came to symbolize the great sacrifices made in war times.  We  read “In Flanders Fieldsand were proud to learn that its author, Dr. John McCrae, was a Canadian soldier

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animal_group

The Veterans Affairs Canada sent us bookmarks and newspapers about Animals in War.  Animals can sometimes be heros too!  http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/youth/sub.cfm?source=activities/kidszone     

A very IMPORTANT part of Remembrance Day is thinking about how WE can make the world a better, kinder place.  “Make the World a Little Bit Better” is a song by Charlotte Diamond that gives us some good ideas like “if I listen to you, and you listen too, soon there’ll be others like me and you“.   We got together with our Gr. 5 Buddy Class to make a Postcard Display of ways we can appreciate our  Veterans or the Unknown Soldier. We read the poem “Poppy, Poppy” and wrote our favourite ways that “Children Can Help“. 

Here are our ideas  (with the most popular ones are at the top):

   Children can…
be thoughtful
share their toys
be kind to others
be nice instead of bullying
can help people when they need help
play together
listen when someone is talking
be helpful and friendly
love each other
be responsible
wear a poppy
help when someone is sick
encourage others
be happy
line up nicely

Remembrance Day
is only one day…
please keep the spirit alive all year!

 VW-lg-banner-e

Remembrance Day

poppy

 

Poppy Poem… Author Unknown

Poppy, Poppy, what do you say?
Wear me on Remembrance Day.
Poppy, Poppy, what do you tell?
That many soldiers in battle fell.
Poppy, Poppy, what do you know?
That peace on earth should grow and grow.

Poppy, we are but children small,
We are too little to do it all.

Children, you may do your part.
Love one another is how you start.
Play without fighting,
Share your games and toys.
Be kind and thoughtful to all girls and boys.

We ALL have a part in making the WORLD a Place of Peace.

Remembrance Day

Poppy Poem… Author Unknown

Poppy, Poppy, what do you say?
Wear me on Remembrance Day.
Poppy, Poppy, what do you tell?
That many soldiers in battle fell.
Poppy, Poppy, what do you know?
That peace on earth should grow and grow.

Poppy, we are but children small,
We are too little to do it all.

Children, you may do your part.
Love one another is how you start.
Play without fighting,
Share your games and toys.
Be kind and thoughtful to all girls and boys.

We ALL have a part in making the WORLD a Place of Peace.

 

Remembrance Day

Poppy Poem… Author Unknown

Poppy, Poppy, what do you say?
Wear me on Remembrance Day.
Poppy, Poppy, what do you tell?
That many soldiers in battle fell.
Poppy, Poppy, what do you know?
That peace on earth should grow and grow.

Poppy, we are but children small,
We are too little to do it all.

Children, you may do your part.
Love one another is how you start.
Play without fighting,
Share your games and toys.
Be kind and thoughtful to all girls and boys.

We ALL have a part in making the WORLD a Place of Peace.

 

Peaceful Thoughts for Remembrance Day on PhotoPeach

What is YOUR most PEACEFUL thought or place
that you are GRATEFUL to have?

First Nations Talking Circle

We were pleased to welcome First Nations presenters, Dawn and Lori, to our classroom last week.  We were priviledged to hear some of their personal stories, as well as share our own.  We learned that humans are given 2 eyes for looking, 2 ears for listening, but only 1 mouth for talking… because we should WATCH and  LISTEN twice as often as we SPEAK!  Dawn wore her beautiful button blanket coat. Her cedar bark hat had a real eagle feather on it!

 Trust, Honor, and Respect are very important words… and we made the connection with our own “Nestor Pride” motto, to be eNcouraging, rEsponsible, Safe, Trustworthy, hOnest, and Respectful!  We took 4 turns around the Talking Circle, each one with a different focus.  In the center of the circle was a magic fire that we made burn with our imagination and by rubbing our hands really fast! 

East is the color yellow signifying new beginnings.  It is the time of the Child; a time of learning and fun. South is the color black.  It is the time of the Young Warrior. Our teens have the hardest time in life.  It is the time when you need  to listen and walk with the Earth Mother. West is the color red. The time of the Warrior is a time of responsibility and a time of protection and patience.  North is the color white, which honours the Elders.  It is a time of humour and understanding… a time of wisdom and a time of understanding that wisdom is a gift of birth not always earned with age. (Thank you, Dawn, for emailing me this lovely explanation!)

We waited with patience for each student to speak, or to choose not to speak.  Everyone got to take a special stone from the rabbit fur bag and we each got a “magic pencil” that reflected our warmth by changing color when we held it. We learned about being thankful for what you have got, and not asking for something more or something different.


 

At the end of our time together, Dawn even let Mrs. Boekhout wear the special button blanket and hat! Then she gave our class a REAL Talking Stick made out of rabbit fur and deer skin.  Mrs. Boekhout is going to use it with her ladybug “gratitude stone” for the weekly class meeting!

THANK YOU, Dawn and Lori,
 You shared your First Nations heritage with us
and we learned about the cycles of the great Earth Mother
and we learned lessons of patience and respect for others
.

 

The Maple Man… La Grande Coulée

We had such a special treat today…
the “Maple Man” came to perform at our school! 

It was a real coincidence in timing, because Mrs. Boekhout and Monty Moose had just come back from their very first (but very short) trip to Quebec.  (They didn’t get to see a Maple farm, but they did get to go dogsledding!  That, however, will be in ANOTHER post!)

The Maple Man, René Turmel, is a third generation “Maple Sugar” producer.  His Maple tree grove is in Sainte-Marie de Beauce, near Quebec City, Quebec but most of the year he lives in the Okanagan Valley, BC.  He travels across Canada sharing some of the traditions and history of French Canadians

Watch our video to see some of the wonderful learning from this session:

 

The Maple Man Video 

 Have you ever eaten “Le tire” (Maple Taffy)?
Has the Maple Man ever been to your school?

Here are some videos of us “in action” with the Maple Man!

1. It was fun learning how sticks and spoons can make rhythms and music!

Maple Man Music

2.  We also learned some fancy dance steps from a wooden puppet!

Maple Man Dancing

3. Finally, we got to see the making of “le tire” and EAT SOME! Yum!

Maple Man Taffy

Which instrument would you like to play the most…
the spoons,  the fiddle,  or  the accordian?

 

 

 

Remembrance Day

We have been busy reading and learning about Remembrance Day. The book “A Poppy is to Remember” helped us understand why the poppy is such an important symbol for Remembrance Day.  We were honoured to hear that the famous poem, “In Flanders Fields” was written by a Canadian army doctor. His poem is very sad and the illustrations in this book really touched our hearts.

Lots of the children in our class have relatives who have been in a war.  Some of them died in the war, but many of them came home, with terrible memories of what it is like to be in a war. Some of them were in the army, some were in the navy and some may have been in the airforce.  One student in our class has a brother who is a soldier in Afganistan right now.  That makes us all feel worried for him, but proud that he is helping to make the world free and safe.

 

 
War and Peace on PhotoPeach

 

We also learned about how animals have made a contribution to war efforts.  Veterns Affairs Canada sent us their “Animals in War” newspapers.  This year’s paper was called “Archway of Remembrance”.    Our Grade 5 Buddy class read the newspapers with us and then we all got to take our own copies home.
http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/activities/kidszone/tales_animals/2011

 

We have been thinking about how “Children Can Help.   The poem “Poppy, Poppy” reminds us that even children can do their part to make the world a happier, kinder place. We made big PEACE posters with ways that children can care, share, and cooperate. We read Todd Parr’s book, “Peace” and talked about how lucky we are here in Canada. Then we did our own pictures of things that are special to us and what would happen to them if we were at war.  At Primary Sing-Along, we all sang “Where Have All the Flowers Gone” (Peter, Paul, and Mary) and “Make the World a Little Bit Better” with sign language (Charlotte Diamond).  Our class also watched the video “A Pittance in Time”, a moving reminder from Nova Scotia, Canada, to take the time to observe the 2 minutes of silence on Nov. 11.

 

The Remembrance Day ceremony at school was very moving.  There were presentations by students, songs by the choir, and placing of wreaths by the K/1 students. Mr. Della Vedova shared a memory of his own Grandfather.

Today, in 2011, on the 11th hour on the 11th day on the 11th month, an emotional service was performed at Victory Square in Vancouver. One of the poems read was from a plaque in Stanley Park. It reminds us that WE are the LIVING SPIRIT of those who gave their lives for us.

 The Vancouver Junior Bach Choir performed the Canadian poem, “In Flanders Field”, in song.  Here is a video of this beautiful song from the 2009 ceremony.

 

We created our own video of the poem “Poppy, Poppy”.  Mrs. Boekhout copied this poem off a Vancouver school display board over 20 years ago, but has never been able to find the name of the poet.  She hopes that this year’s class will always remember to be children who SHARE, CARE, and  COOPERATE.

You can watch our  POPPY POEM VIDEO here.

 

Children, you may do your part
Love one another
is how you start!

 

Gung Hay Fat Choy! Happy Chinese New Year!

Bang! Bang! Bang! Ting-Ting! Phsst! Pop! Bang! Bang!

Let the Year of the Rabbit begin!

Today we celebrated the start of the Chinese New Year with our traditional Nestor Chinese New Year Parade. It is a VERY noisy activity with the sound of loud firecrackers and Chinese music coming over the PA system and the entire school cheering and waving Chinese lanterns and dragon puppets along the hallways.

We have a very special dragon… the head was made by Nestor teachers in 1998 and the body was made by Nestor parents in 2000 with material donated by almost every student in the school! We also have a traditional Chinese Lion head, as well as a “little” Lion head, brought back from Hong Kong by one of Mrs. Boekhout’s parents. Our Grade 5 Buddy class takes care of the heavy dragon head and the big banners, but Classroom 2 kids get to have a turn in the looooonnnnng dragon body, as well as the two lions!

Our class is all born in 2003, which is “Year of the Sheep” (or Goat), except for our students born in January, who are “Year of the Horse”!

You can check out some Chinese New Year information at Mrs. B’s website.

Here is a short VIDEO of the beginning of our parade!!!

cnyr_video1

and our dragon made it on to the front page of the local newspaper too!!!

http://www.thenownews.com/PHOTOS+Gung+Choy/4226427/story.html

What an EXCITING time!!!